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Gibson have a great story about Guns N’ Roses’ debut album, Appetite for Destruction, where a young Slash was getting frustrated when trying to achieve the right “tone” with a range of contemporary electric guitars. “Then someone handed him a reissue-style Les Paul Standard, and that was all she wrote.”

With the Les Paul in hand, Slash laid down a host of riffs powered the biggest-selling debut album of all time and propelling songs like “Sweet Child O’ Mine”, “Welcome to the Jungle” and “Paradise City”, into the hearts and minds of musicians everywhere.

With the rock legend offering his valuable input, the Gibson Slash Appetite Les Paul model focuses on maintaining the impeccable styling of the original first sold in 1952 as well as tweaking the sound to fit Slash’s playing style.

Just like Slash’s original guitar he used for “Appetite for Destruction”, the Gibson Slash Appetite Les Paul mimics a lot of the most admired features of the original Les Paul Standards from the late 50’s and early 60’s, such as a slim neck profile and a body based on a 1959 Les Paul.

Gibson have done a brilliant job in the authentic finish that gives the Slash Appetite Les Paul the look of a gently aged vintage guitar and features like a traditional Les Paul carved maple top and mahogany back and a one-piece mahogany neck give this axe tremendous character.

The Gibson Slash Appetite Les Paul model features Slash inspired hardware in two Seymour Duncan Alnico II Pro Slash signature humbucker pickups at both the neck and bridge positions, which offer players an incredible selection of sounds with a mini-toggle switch inserted between the iconic volume control knobs to help regulate acoustic and hybrid acoustic/electric tones.

From the second I plugged this thing into my Marshall Amp, the classic-rock sound I had been hoping for just exploded out of the speakers. The sound is exactly what you’d expect from a Les Paul/Marshall combo with chords giving a nice thick, chunky, deep tone, and lengthy, howling notes when soloing.

With features and characteristics that inspire Slash, Gibson Custom has created one of its most distinct and best sounding Les Paul models ever, and quite possible the perfect axe for any Slash fans.

 

 

Joey Kramer, one of the most famous drummers of all time, has been drumming with Aerosmith for over 40 years. His reward? His very own signature Ludwig Joey Kramer Model snare.

 

A limited production, the Joey Kramer snare is very similar to the Corey Miller signature model and Ludwig's other new snare, The Brick. With nylon washers under the tension rods, it features almost exactly the same conventional throw-off. The main difference between the models, to me anyway, is that each Joey Kramer drum is hand-signed by Joey himself on an internal paper slip.

 

The black nickel over 1.5mm gauge brass shell looks impressive with impeccably engraved Asian style dragons lacing the sides. The dragons are encased by 5mm die-cast hoops and 10 black nickel-plated brass tube lugs.

 

Despite their similarities the  Joey Kramer's brass shell drum is much heavier than Corey Miller's steel counterpart, and plays with a deep, dark fundamental. One potential stick-splitting danger is the die-cast hoops, but if you are careful, they are worth having as they really enfold sound really well, making the Joey Kramer snare loud but less unruly than the steel Corey Miller. It has a fat and warm tone making it sound exceptionally refined, and is capable of a wide tuning and dynamic range.

 

Now before you rush out and buy this fantastic snare, I’m afraid there is a bit of a drawback. Firstly, I was a little disappointed that Ludwig didn’t put their name anywhere on the Joey Kramer signature. It’s not a big deal but it would of been the icing on the cake to have a superior brand listed on a superior product.

 

The second and more financially damaging drawback is the price. At the time of writing, Ludwig are shipping these bad boys out at about £700. That’s a full £250 more than the Corey Miller model. Although it is probably worth every penny, this is definitely one for hardcore drummers, leaving the amateurs in their dust...unless of course, they can find it cheap on Instrumania.

Epiphone Dot Limited Edition Review

 

Basically a cheaper version of the Gibson 335, the Korean made Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition comes with 22 frets and 2 Gibson humbuckers (with Alnico magnets).

 

The laminated maple body and neck, and rosewood fingerboard, are finished beautifully with gold fittings complete with a 3 way switch with 2 volume and 2 tone controls.

 

It came with the Epiphone "E" logo on the scratch plate but started to peel off almost immediately. However, here is when the problems with the Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition stopped. I know there was a time when perhaps people would be wary of a Korean built guitar, but this axe is superbly made and very well finished especially at this price point.

 

For a semi, Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition is actually pretty heavy due to the solid block running through the middle, but it’s still manageable and completely worth the extra weight.

 

It sounds good and although not quite up to a real Gibson 335, it's really not that far off considering the price difference, making the Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition a perfect Gibson 335 alternative.

 

The Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition’s humbucker gives a lovely warm sound and really screams when cranked up a bit while still giving a nice thick sound. As they are humbuckers you don't suffer much noise partly due to the solid block that helps reduce the feedback that would be a nightmare had it been.

 

Someone on a limited budget can't really go wrong with one of these. So if you would like a real Gibson 335 but just don't feel the extra cash will bring enough extra quality to justify the cost. I suggest the Epiphone Dot Ltd Edition as the perfect Gibson 335 alternative. Or, if you’d like to find different cheap guitars that fit your budget, try the Instrumania musical instruments search today.

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